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Media Training: Sales owns interview, not the PM

After appearing on last night’s 7:30 program, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull would have been hoping for today’s headlines to signify the billion dollar innovation package he launched alongside Minister for Innovation, Christopher Pine. However, the headlines today tell a different story: I ask the questions on this program… Leigh Sales reinforced during their 15minute interview.

So how did it all go so wrong? How did the Prime Minister fail to sell the major benefits of this generous innovation package? Was the subject discussed so dry and dull that the journalist seized the opportunity to keep her viewers interested by throwing up several hard-hitting unrelated questions?

What this interview shows us is that not only do you need to be well-briefed and prepared on the details of your topic (in which Mr Turnbull was not, stumbling to answer obvious how, why, what and where questions) but having answers ready—or at least linking and bridging techniques sorted—for those hard-hitting, uncomfortable questions on current political issues floating around.

Another observation of the Prime Minister’s interview was his frequent shifts in body language, particularly when the tough questions started to fly. Not only is it distracting, it can be perceived as incriminating. If you prepare in advance for the worst questions you could face, you can help avoid that physical response.

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2015/s4367704.htm

What did you think of last night’s interview? Are today’s headlines a fair representation of how it unfolded?

Media manners

When Charlotte, from this year’s reality show The Block, appeared on The Today Show this morning, I don’t think she was expecting the headline to be about swearing on live Television.

Increasingly we are seeing a lot more tolerance from the Producers of reality shows regarding swearing.
Even if you’re a habitual “swearer” the choice of language you use, especially on G rated television, can impact your credibility. Would you hire someone if they swore in an job interview? Same goes for television.
So how do you avoid the gaff of swearing? Practice your key messages, focus on why you’re doing the interview and lastly, avoid getting too conversational and falling into the trap of lazy communication by throwing in a swear word. Your interview will be remembered for all the wrong reasons, as Charlotte now knows!

Media training: Marshawn Lynch goes OTT with his key message!

So it’s one thing to prepare a key message and weave it into a media interview…. it’s a whole new ball game (pardon pun) to do a Marshawn Lynch … but gee did he get worldwide attention and I think we all got the message!  If you missed him take a look:

Marshawn Lynch

How to deliver a simple key message!

This little story from the Daily Telegraph recently caught my attention. Note how the Police Inspector sticks to his key message about new mobile phone laws.  He gets final say – and I’d suggest police media will be very pleased!

 

Look officer, it’s a Tic Tac box not a phone, says fined teacher Marina Alexiou

A fine mess … Marina Alexiou, from Bondi / Pic: Justin Lloyd Source: The Daily Telegraph

IT was the packet of Tic Tacs that left a bad taste in this Sydney mum’s mouth.

Marina Alexiou claims she was pulled over and issued a $298 fine for handing the lollies to her two children in the backseat – after a police officer mistook the mints for a mobile phone.

The Bondi resident was driving her children to school along Old South Head Rd when she was pulled over at 8.20am. She claims her phone was in her handbag, on the passenger seat, the entire time.

“He pulled me over and said ‘Where’s your phone?’,” said an infuriated Ms Alexiou yesterday. “And I said ‘It’s in my bag’. So I searched in my bag and it was there.

“I just feel gutted.”

Ms Alexiou said even her children told the officer she had been passing them Tic Tacs when she was stopped on December 5. She plans to contest the matter in court.

“What infuriates me the most is that I am a primary school teacher who often calls on police officers to come speak to children at school to help build good relations and diminish the idea that police officers are (just) the people that put baddies to jail but rather that they are people of integrity and people whom you could trust.

“My own children went to school understanding that police officers lie, they intimidate and you can’t trust them.”

A police spokesman said the infringement was issued and said Ms Alexiou could challenge it.

“New mobile phone laws make it quite clear, if you are using a phone without a cradle you will be fined,” said Inspector Phil Brooks.
#keymessage #mediatraining #interviewskills